Buena Mexi Chicken Chowder – small

$ 4.79

Product Description

It’s the potatoes that make this soup so delicious. All of our potatoes come from Washington and Oregon, right next to our home base. This allows us to make small orders and ensure we’re using the newest crop.

Ingredients: Dehydrated potato cubes, potato flake, dehydrated celery, dehydrated carrot, jalapeño, bell pepper chicken base*, gluten free rice flour, herbs, spices, salt & black pepper.
*Chicken Base : Tapioca maltodextrin, salt, potato flour, onion, garlic, natural chicken broth, dried chicken, cane sugar, celery, curry, turmeric, black pepper. Contains no artificial flavors, preservatives or added M.S.G.

Nutritional information Buena Chicken Chowder

You will need:
8 oz. Evaporated milk or milk substitute
1/8 lb. Bacon (optional)
1/2 Fresh Chicken Breast or 6 oz. Canned Chicken

Package Includes: Potato and spice mixture

Directions: Chop and cook bacon then drain fat. Combine 3 cups water, bacon, cooked meat and optional ingredients, cover and bring to a boil. Add soup package, cover and reduce to simmer. Cook for 20 minutes or until potatoes are soft. Stir occasionally to prevent scorching. When potatoes are done add 1 Cup of your milk choice. Heat until warm, do not boil. Top with grated cheese (optional). Serve!

Crockpot Directions: Add water, the entire soup mix and precooked meat to the slow cooker. Cook on low for 2 hours (minimum) to 6 hours (maximum). Add milk right before serving. Enjoy!

Cashew Milk Substitute: Using blender, add 1-1/2 cups water and 1/2 cup raw cashews. Blend until creamy. Add 8 oz. as a milk substitute, approx. 1 Cup.

Cooking Variations: Add 1/4 cup white wine or 1/4 cup sour cream. Top with grated cheddar cheese or Velveeta cheese or chives. Substitute bacon with ham or sausage.

Tidbits of History
Buena, Washington is a little known but important junction in the lower Yakima Valley. The Buena Junction takes off of I-82 at exit 50 onto highway 22. Heading South it takes you through the city of Toppenish, which is known for the many western themed murals that can be seen painted throughout the city. The murals attract thousands of visitors each year and are well worth the drive to see.

This area is also an agricultural hub surrounded by lush fields, vineyards and orchards. During WWII Yakima Valley farmers were in desperate need of laborers. Most of the young American men were in the armed forces and many U.S. laborers had gone to work in defense plants located around the Puget Sound area. The federal government established the Brancero Program that allowed Mexican laborers to enter the United States on a temporary basis during the harvest season, meeting the needs of these farmers. Still to this day there are many immigrants working in the area who help harvest a variety of crops including hay, hops, and many types of fruits and vegetables.

This area is a stunningly diverse geographical region. South on Highway 97 is an amazing view of snow capped Mt. Adams. The road winds through the open sagebrush and grass covered hills of the Yakama Indian reservation. There are dramatic changes in scenery as you travel through the inclines and descents of the Simcoe Mountains and over Satus Pass. The view opens up at Goldendale, Washington to the sight of thousands of acres of dry land farming.

While traveling along Highway 97 make sure to stop at Stonehenge Memorial, Mary Hill Museum, then plan a picnic and swim at the Mary Hill State Park along the Columbia River.

Even More Tidbits of History:
In the Andes Mountains of South America, Pre-Columbia farmers discovered and cultivated the potato some 7000 years ago. In this harsh climate with poor soil conditions and fluctuating weather, the farmers were impressed with the plant’s hardiness, nutritional advantages and its ability to be stored. The Spanish discovered the tubular in 1537 when they marched through Peru but it was considered to be a poor mans food and was used predominately to feed hospitalized inmates.

It took three decades for the potato to gain popularity throughout the rest of Europe. In France, Antoine Augustine Parmentier, a pharmacist, chemist and employee of Louis XV realized the benefits of potatoes. He found the nutritional benefit of the potato, combined with it productive capabilities, could be a boost to the French farmer. After failing by conventional means to convince the Frenchmen of its many advantages, he decided on a surreptitious plan to make his point.

Parmentier acquired an unproductive plot of ground just on the outskirts of Paris. He planted 50 acres of potatoes and during the day hired a guard to look over it. When evening arrived, the guard was let go and the locals came to see what was of such importance. Many of the peasants believed that this plant must be very valuable and therefore took it upon themselves to “acquire” some from the plot. Soon they were growing the potato in their own gardens.

The potato gained wide acceptance across Europe and soon made its way to North America. Over time, the potato has become one of the major food stuffs of the world.

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