St. Marie's Wild Chicken Soup

The St. Marie’s Wild Chicken soup has been a crowd pleaser from day one. It tastes like homemade chicken rice soup and is perfect for kids who are a bit pickier. Dress it up with fresh summer squash and garlic butter chicken or just throw it in a pot all by itself and have dinner on the table in less than an hour.

$4.79$6.95

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You will need:

  • 1/2 Fresh chicken breast or 3 oz. of canned chicken

Package Includes:

  • Rice Mixture
  • 1 Spice Packet

Directions:

Stovetop Directions
1. In a 4 Quart saucepan add 4 cups water, the rice, both packets and cubed chicken.
2. Bring to a boil then reduce to simmer for 1 hour or until the wild rice is tender.
3. Salt and pepper to taste.
4. Serve.

Crock Pot Directions:
Add 4 C. water, the entire soup mix and cubed chicken to the slow cooker. Cook on low for 2 to 5 hours. The longer you leave the soup in the slow cooker the more the rice will expand and the thicker the soup will be, do not over cook.

Instant Pot Directions:
Reduce water by 1/2 cup. Add water, soup mix and meat to Instant Pot. Lock the lid and seal the valve, set to Soup Mode, or High Pressure. Cook for 10 minutes, allow the pressure to release naturally or manually let the steam off.


Cooking Variations:

Make it Creamy: Reduce water by 1/2 C. follow cooking directions, before serving add 1/2 C. evaporated milk or cream.
Vegetable Overload: 10-15 minutes before the soup is done, add 1 or 2 cups of fresh vegetables. Our favorite addition is broccoli.
Mix up the Meat: Use pork or italian sausage
Boost the Broth: Cook with bone in chicken – such as a thigh

You will need:

  • 1 Fresh chicken breast or 6 oz. of canned chicken

Package Includes:

  • Rice Mixture
  • 1 Chicken Broth Packet
  • 1 Spice Packet

Directions:

1. In a 4 Quart saucepan add 8 cups water, the rice, both packets and cubed chicken.
2. Bring to a boil then reduce to simmer for 1 hour or until the wild rice is tender.
3. Salt and pepper to taste.
4. Serve.

Crock Pot Directions:
Add 8 C. water, the entire soup mix and cubed chicken to the slow cooker. Cook on low for 2 to 5 hours. The longer you leave the soup in the slow cooker the more the rice will expand and the thicker the soup will be, do not over cook.

Instant Pot Directions:
Reduce water by 1 cup. Add water, soup mix and meat to Instant Pot. Lock the lid and seal the valve, set to Soup Mode, or High Pressure. Cook for 10 minutes, allow the pressure to release naturally or manually let the steam off.


Cooking Variations:

Make it Creamy: Reduce water by 1/2 C. follow cooking directions, before serving add 1 C. evaporated milk or cream.
Vegetable Overload: 10-15 minutes before the soup is done, add 1 or 2 cups of fresh vegetables. Our favorite addition is broccoli.
Mix up the Meat: Use pork or italian sausage
Boost the Broth: Cook with bone in chicken – such as a thigh
Vegetarian: Prepare without meat, discard the yellow chicken base packet. Use 15 oz. vegetable broth and reduce water by 2 cups. If desired, add meat substitute.
Low Sodium: Discard the chicken packet, replace 2 cups of water with low sodium chicken broth or simply add less of the chicken packet to reduce the sodium.

Centuries ago, wild rice grew naturally in the muddy bottoms of shallow lakes and rivers of Minnesota, Ontario, and southern Manitoba. Sioux and Chippewa Indians depended on wild rice, or “Manomin”, to meet their vegetative dietary needs. Manomin’s value laid in the high protein content and indefinite storage capabilities. Often, these qualities made the difference between life and death during the winter months. During the fall, tribes set up camps along the lakes and rivers in anticipation of the harvest. Many wars among the Indian Tribes ensued over the wild rice stands.

Explorers reported observing the women moving through the water in birch-bark canoes while grasping wild rice stalks. Afterward, the wild rice would be cured. Three methods could be employed to cure wild rice. First, wild rice could be spread out on blankets or mats in the sun. Second, wild rice could be spread out on racks under a fire, which served as the source of curing heat. Last, wild rice could be poured into a large kettle, placed over a slow fire, and stirred continuously. Once the curing process was completed, the men would thresh the tough hulls. On average, one family produced five bushels of wild rice, each weighing 300 pounds.

In the 1600s, French fur traders and voyagers began commercializing wild rice, the seed of an annual aquatic grass. During the early 1900s, wild rice started drawing the attention of white settlers and businessmen. In the 1920s, the first large scale processing and packaging factory was developed in Minnesota.

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